Nigerian Athlete, Tobi Amusan 100m hurdle world record has been officially ratified by the World Athletics body.

The Athletics body made the announcement on their website on Tuesday that her world record of 12.12s (0.9) set at the 2022 World Championship in Oregon USA has been ratified.

After improving on USA’s Kendra Harrison 2016 record, Amusan became the first Nigerian to hold a World Athletics record.

There were a total of four World Record set at the World Athletics Championship in Oregon which were all ratified on Tuesday.

The statement from the World Athletics read:”The world records set by Tobi Amusan, Mondo Duplantis and Sydney McLaughlin at the World Athletics Championships Oregon22 have been ratified.

“Amusan’s 12.12 in the women’s 100m hurdles semifinals, Duplantis’s 6.21m in the men’s pole vault final and McLaughlin’s 50.68 in the women’s 400m hurdles final are all now officially in the record books, as is the world U20 mark of 9.94 set by Letsile Tebogo in the men’s 100m heats.

“McLaughlin’s was the first of the senior records to fall at this year’s World Athletics Championships, the US 23-year-old obliterating her own previous world record with a time of 50.68. 

“It is the fourth world 400m hurdles record of McLaughlin’s career following her 51.90 at the 2021 US Olympic Trials, 51.46 at the Olympic Games in Tokyo and 51.41 achieved at this year’s US Championships. That 51.41 has also now been ratified.

“Since 2019 – in less than three years – the world record has been improved by almost two seconds. The mark of 52.34 had stood for 16 years before USA’s Dalilah Muhammad took it to 52.20 and then 52.16. On 27 June 2021, McLaughlin broke it for the first time.

“Two days later, during the final session of the World Athletics Championships, Amusan and Duplantis ensured that the event ended on an incredible high. 

“After clocking an African record of 12.40 in the 100m hurdles heats, the world was put on notice that 25-year-old Amusan was capable of something special.

“The next day, she ran 12.12 (0.9m/s) in the semifinals to improve the world record of 12.20 that had been set by USA’s Kendra Harrison in London in 2016. 

“Amusan wasn’t done there, though, and she followed that remarkable performance with a wind-assisted 12.06 (2.5m/s) to win the final.“